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Lancing College Evelyn Waugh Lecture 2015
20th May 2015

A very stimulating evening with Charles Moore

On writing the biography of Margaret Thatcher

Charles Moore was this year’s speaker at an outstanding Lancing College Evelyn Waugh lecture . Mr Moore, who is Margaret Thatcher’s official biographer, is also a former editor of the Daily Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph and the Spectator. He gave a fascinating talk attended by a packed audience of pupils, parents, OLs and staff, who were captivated throughout the evening.

Mr Moore talked about the challenges of writing the authorised biography of the most iconic political leader since Churchill. Charles Anson, a very distinguished OL, who has assisted Charles Moore in this monumental task, said of the evening, Charles Moore's talk on Margaret Thatcher was as gripping and witty as the best of Evelyn Waugh's novels and gave... such a good feel of Margaret Thatcher both as political leader and human being."

Lauren Gardner, who is in the lower VI Form, was one of many pupils inspired by the evening. “I found Charles Moore’s talk fascinating. He was both an engaging and eloquent speaker on Mrs Thatcher’s strong and often controversial political career, but was also careful to add a great deal of detail on her early life, including her love of fashion … and even of men! Mr Moore also gave us a real insight into the actual process of writing Margaret Thatcher’s biography which, we were told at the lecture, would now run to three volumes.”

Lancing College has an enviable reputation for its lectures and debates. Its distinguished alumni include writers and playwrights such as Evelyn Waugh, David Hare and Christopher Hampton; and the students’ debating society is one of the most active and exciting in the country. The College holds an annual Evelyn Waugh Lecture and Dinner to thank all members of the Lancing Foundation and those who donate generously to the school.

 

Charles Moore giving the Lancing College Evelyn Waugh lecture